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Winter 2014

FACULTY

José Anderson

Professor Anderson published an op-ed in The Afro on Oct. 23 titled “Judge Blake Issued a Bold, Risky and Wise Opinion.”  Wrote Anderson of Judge Catherine C. Blake of the U.S. District Court of Maryland: “Judge Blake’s ruling, going back to 1890, described Maryland’s higher education system as operating both an exclusionary and a dual system from its beginnings, providing inferior schools for its Black citizens. She explained that despite several commission reports and studies throughout the decades that followed the 1930s ‘separate but equal’ litigation, Maryland had never solved the problems of inequality in higher education.”

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Barbara Babb

Professor Babb’s article “Maryland’s Family Divisions: Sensible Justice for Families and Children” appeared in 72 Maryland Law Review 1124 (2013). The article grew out of a symposium convened to celebrate Maryland Chief Judge Robert M. Bell, who retired last summer.

Professor Babb co-wrote a chapter on therapeutic jurisprudence to appear in the Encyclopedia of Criminology and Criminal Justice (Springer, 2014).

Babb contributed a chapter to Problem Solving Courts: Social Science and Legal Perspectives, which was edited by Richard L. Wiener and Eve M. Brank (Springer, 2013). Babb’s chapter is titled “Unified Family Courts: An Interdisciplinary Framework and a Problem-Solving Approach.”

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John Bessler

Professor Bessler has accepted an invitation to speak about the death penalty at the Nobel Peace Prize Forum in Minneapolis on March 1. The keynote speakers will be the Dalai Lama and Sister Helen Prejean.

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Wendy Gerzog

Professor Gerzog’s article “Graev: Conditional Facade Easement” appeared in 140 Tax Notes 1607 (Sept. 30, 2013).

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Michele Gilman

Professor Gilman spoke Dec. 12 at the New America Foundation. The program – “In Poverty, Under Surveillance” – examined the experiences of families and individuals in the public benefits system, which requires them to provide extensive personal and financial information as well as to submit to unannounced visits, fingerprinting and drug testing.

Gilman spoke about a forthcoming chapter for the book The Poverty Law Canon at an Oct. 25 conference at American University Washington College of Law.  Her chapter focuses on Wyman v. James, in which the Supreme Court upheld government visits to the homes of welfare applicants.

Gilman was a facilitator at the Clinical Law Review Writer’s Workshop at the New York University School of Law on Sept. 28 for a panel titled “Incorporating Interdisciplinary Models in Law Teaching.”

Gilman was a presenter and co-organizer at the Boston Area Clinical Scholarship Workshop, held at Suffolk University Law School on Aug. 8.

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Nienke Grossman

In November, Professor Grossman spoke at a conference about women judges on domestic and international courts at the Université Libre de Bruxelles. Grossman spoke about why international courts have so few women judges. Her remarks can be accessed here.

Grossman recently published “The Normative Legitimacy of International Courts,” 86 Temple Law Review 61 (2013).

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Daniel Hatcher

An Oct. 14 Baltimore Sun op-ed by Professor Hatcher – “How Maryland robs its most vulnerable children” – discussed the hiring of a private firm by the state to obtain Social Security disability and survivor benefits from foster children to use as government revenue. The op-ed prompted a letter to the editor from Ted Dallas, secretary of the state’s Department of Human Resources (“DHR is not ‘robbing’ any children”). Hatcher submitted a rebuttal – “Sorry, but DHR is robbing foster children” – that ran as a letter in The Sun on Oct. 23.

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Michael Higginbotham

Professor Higginbotham delivered three endowed lectures in the fall. The first, on Sept. 11 — the Nellie Nugent Sommerville Lecture on Politics and Public Affairs at Delta State University in Mississippi – was titled “Saving the Dream for All.” On Sept. 17, Higginbotham was the keynote speaker at Ohio’s Cleveland-Marshall College of Law’s Constitution Day, with “Ending Racism in Post-Racial America.” Professor Higginbotham also presented the University of Notre Dame Diversity Lecture on Nov. 14, “Hopeful Dreams and Post-Racial Realities.”

Will Hubbard

Professor Hubbard presented several lectures in the fall. In November, he delivered “The Debilitating Effect of Strong Patents” at the George Washington School of Law and at the University of New Hampshire Intellectual Property Roundtable. In October, Hubbard was a member of a UB School of Law panel, where he delivered “Pixels, Not Papers: Creating and Assessing Digital Assignments.” In September, Hubbard participated in a UB Constitution Day panel titled “U.S. Supreme Court 2013 Term Preview.” Earlier, Hubbard presented “Intellectual Property and X-Inefficiency” at the Mid-Atlantic Patent Works-in-Progress Conference and at the Intellectual Property Scholars Conference.

Hubbard recently published “The Competitive Advantage of Weak Patents,” 54 Boston College Law Review 1909 (2013).

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Margaret Johnson

Professor Johnson was the moderator and the organizer of a panel discussion, “The Link Between Homelessness and Domestic Violence,” at the UB School of Law on Oct. 9.

On Sept. 28, Johnson gave a presentation, “Safety, Not Security,” at the Clinical Law Review’s Clinical Writers’ Workshop at New York University’s School of Law.

Johnson also was the moderator and a discussant at an anniversary celebration at the Women’s Law and Public Policy Fellowship Program at the Georgetown University Law Center in September.

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Elizabeth Keyes

Professor Keyes was quoted in a Jan. 9 article in The New York Times, “Claim Against Indian Diplomat Has Echoes of Previous Cases.” Keyes wrote a follow-up letter, “Diplomats and Their Help,” that was published Jan. 14.

Keyes and student Jose Perez were featured in a Dec. 3 Daily Record article, “Law student paves way for asylum seeker.” Perez, a 3L who works in the Immigrant Rights Clinic, spent five months drafting a brief on behalf of a transgender asylum seeker from Honduras. “He was so well prepared, the hearing took only 45 minutes,” the story said of Perez. Said Keyes, director of the clinic: “Jose has been dedicated since the first day. … He took responsibility for this case immediately.”

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Dionne Koller

Professor Koller published an op-ed in The Baltimore Sun on Nov. 20 titled “High school football: a dangerous game.” In light of the injuries and deaths of young players, Koller argued that parents, coaches, schools and youth sports groups should change the rules of the game to better protect children.

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Robert Lande

On Dec. 3, Professor Lande participated in a debate at the American Antitrust Institute’s annual Conference on Private Antitrust Enforcement, at the National Press Club in Washington, D.C. The topic was whether private antitrust enforcement is desirable.

On Oct. 5, Lande gave a talk in Florence, Italy, titled “The U.S. Experience With Private Antitrust Enforcement.” The address was given at a workshop on private antitrust enforcement held by the European University Institute.

Professor Lande wrote or co-wrote the following articles:

Joshua P. Davis and Robert H. Lande, “Defying Conventional Wisdom: The Case for Private Antitrust Enforcement,” 48 Georgia Law Review 1 (2013).

Thomas J. Horton and Robert H. Lande, “Should the Internet Exempt the Media Sector From the Antitrust Laws?” 65 Florida Law Review 1521 (2013).

Joshua P. Davis and Robert H. Lande, “Toward an Empirical and Theoretical Assessment of Private Antitrust Enforcement,” 36 Seattle Law Review 1269 (2013).

Robert H. Lande, “A Traditional and Textual Analysis of the Goals of Antitrust:  Efficiency, Preventing Theft From Consumers, and Consumer Choice,” 81 Fordham Law Review 2349 (2013).

Jaime Lee

Professor Lee published “Can You Hear Me Now?” 7 Harvard Law & Policy Review 405 (2013).

With Professor Nancy Modesitt, Lee was recognized as Teacher of the Year for the University of Baltimore School of Law at January’s annual meeting of the Association of American Law Schools in New York.

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Michael Meyerson

Professor Meyerson had a letter published in the Dec. 1 New York Times Book Review. Responding to a review of Thomas Jefferson’s Qur’an, Meyerson wrote: “Jefferson’s reading of the Quran was part of his education, but it certainly did not ‘account for his most enduring contributions to liberal democracy.’”

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Nancy Modesitt

With Professor Jaime Lee, Professor Modesitt was recognized as Teacher of the Year for the University of Baltimore School of Law at January’s annual meeting of the Association of American Law Schools.

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Jane Murphy & Robert Rubinson

In December, Professors Murphy and Rubinson presented a paper, “Legal Education, Low Income Communities and Informal Justice,” at Jindal Global Law School in India at the annual conference of the Global Alliance for Justice Education. They were among delegates representing 60 countries and more than 100 law schools.

Max Oppenheimer

Professor Oppenheimer represented the inventor of a vaccine designed to prevent and/or treat cancer and certain infections, which received a patent from the U.S. Patent Office on Nov. 26 (U.S. Patent 8,592,391).[u4]  The vaccine is in clinical trials in the United States, at The Johns Hopkins University and at the Medical University of South Carolina, and in Canada.

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Mortimer Sellers

Professor Sellers gave a lecture in October at the Casa Machiavelli near Florence, Italy, at the invitation of the International Association of Constitutional Law to commemorate the 500th anniversary of Niccolò Machiavelli’s The Prince. Sellers’ talk was titled “Niccolò Machiavelli: The Father of Modern Constitutionalism.”

In November, Sellers delivered “The Fundamental Requirements of the Rule of Law” at the Constitutional Court of the Russian Federation in St. Petersburg at the invitation of the American Bar Association and the Russian Federation Society of Advocates.

Judge Frederic Smalkin

On Nov. 13, Judge Smalkin presented the School of Law’s inaugural Stephen L. Snyder Lecture on Litigation. His talk was titled “A Brief History of the Jury Trial From About 1250 to the Present.” Maryland Court of Appeals Judge Lynne Battaglia and attorney Charles Iliff provided commentary.

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Charles Tiefer

In a Jan. 2 interview with Federal News Radio, Professor Tiefer, a former member of the federal Commission on Wartime Contracting in Iraq and Afghanistan, said that competition for federal contracts should be tougher in 2014 as a result of the government’s effort to increase transparency in bidding and procurement. Tiefer was quoted in a front-page New York Times story on Nov. 30, “Scandal Widens Over Contracts for Navy Work.”

Tiefer also was quoted in an Oct. 24 Marketplace story about the initially problem-plagued Obamacare website. Tiefer’s question for the contractors responsible for the site: Was the project underfunded from the beginning?

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Byron Warnken

On Oct. 22, students, faculty, staff and alumni attended an event in the law school’s moot courtroom to celebrate the publication of Professor Warnken’s three-volume treatise, Maryland Criminal Procedure.

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Dean Ronald Weich

On Nov. 21, Dean Weich took part in a panel on federal sentencing at the University of New Hampshire School of Law’s Warren B. Rudman Center for Justice, Leadership and Public Policy.

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STAFF

Claudia Diamond

Director of Academic Support Claudia Diamond contributed an op-ed to The Baltimore Sun on Nov. 7. In “Bar exam does not a lawyer make,” Diamond argued that prospective admittees to the bar be required to provide pro bono services to the poor and to institutions helping society’s most vulnerable.

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LIBRARY

Adeen Postar has accepted an offer to serve as the new director of the law library, succeeding long-time director Will Tress, who retired in December. Postar, who has worked as a law librarian and as the deputy director of the Pence Law Library at American University Washington College of Law since 2004, earned a master’s degree in library science from Catholic University of America School of Library and Information Science. She also holds a J.D. and a bachelor’s degree from Washington University in St. Louis, Mo. Professor Audrey McFarlane headed the library director search committee. Joanne Colvin is serving as the acting law library director until Postar begins work on May 12.

Clement Lau, the library’s associate director for technical services and administration, resigned Feb. 1 to assume a new position as the associate librarian for technical and collection services at Hong Kong Baptist University. He can be reached at ccslau@hkbu.edu.hk.

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LAW SCHOOL ACTIVITIES

On Dec. 16, representatives from the Baltimore office of KIND (Kids In Need of Defense), which is housed in the John and Frances Angelos Law Center, offered an introductory immigration law training to UB School of Law alumni.

As part of a national Legal Writing Institute series, the UB School of Law hosted a one-day workshop at the Angelos Law Center on Dec. 13. Organized by Claudia Diamond and titled “Preparing Practice-Ready Students,” the workshop drew legal writing educators from across the country.

A Nov. 14 symposium sponsored by the University of Baltimore Law Forum brought together prominent attorneys, legislators and judges for a lively discussion and debate about the impacts of voter referenda, recent court cases and potential legislation on Maryland lawmaking.

On Nov. 9, a forum on diversity in the law featured talks by Professors Gilda Daniels, Audrey McFarlane and Michael Meyerson, as well as by Mark Bell, the UB School of Law’s director of diversity initiatives and recruitment.

On Nov. 6, David Thaler presented a talk titled “Sprawlburbia: The American Dream?” Thaler, a fellow of the American Society of Civil Engineers and the National Society of Professional Engineers and a surveyor, land planner and land-use consultant, discussed the spread of sprawl in the United States over the past several decades.

On Oct. 31, the School of Law’s chapter of the Federalist Society sponsored a discussion led by Harvey A. Silverglate, the author of Three Felonies a Day: How the Feds Target the Innocent. The talk was moderated by Professor Byron Warnken.

Marcia Coyle, J.D. `86, the chief Washington correspondent for the National Law Journal, visited the law school on Oct. 28 to discuss her book The Roberts Court: The Struggle for the Constitution. Coyle has covered the Supreme Court for 25 years.

On Oct. 25, Professor Garrett Epps and University of Texas law professor and author Sanford Levinson met at the law center to discuss Epps’ latest book, American Epic: Reading the U.S. Constitution, which was published by Oxford University Press in August. Levinson, like Epps a constitutional scholar, concluded: “I think Garrett likes the Constitution more than I do.” The hourlong discussion can be viewed here (the recording is broken into three sections):
Part I: Sanford Levinson
Part II: Garrett Epps
Part III: Q&A

On Oct. 24, a former federal prosecutor and a lawyer whom he prosecuted took part in an ethics program titled “The Consequences of Public Corruption: An Insider’s Story.”  The program featured Henry J. “Hank” Shea, now a senior distinguished fellow at the University of St. Thomas School of Law, and Richard Juliano, a one-time deputy to disgraced former Gov. George Ryan of Illinois. Ryan pleaded guilty to mail fraud in 2002. Juliano was a cooperating witness in the trials of Ryan and his associates.

The UB School of Law’s Black Law Students Association, the Public Justice Center and the National Coalition for a Civil Right to Counsel presented a panel discussion at the law center on Oct. 24 titled “Civil Gideon: The Movement for a Civil Right to Counsel.”

The Judicial Institute at the UB School of Law presented a program titled “The Impact of Poverty in Judicial Decision-Making” on Oct. 24. Professor Michele Gilman helped coordinate the event and was a speaker.

From Oct. 7-18, the UB School of Law was host to 20 judges from the Nanjing People’s Intermediate Court in Nanjing, China. The program, organized by Professor Eric Easton, focused on judges’ roles in American civil litigation. Faculty members that took part included The Hon. Frederic Smalkin, Robert Rubinson, Byron Warnken, James Maxeiner and John Lynch. Clement Lau, technical services director in the law library, also participated, as did visiting scholars Wang Yonggang, Shen Xiuqin and Zhang Jing. Staff member Rose McMunn provided logistical support.

On Oct. 7, the School of Law’s chapter of the Federalist Society sponsored a debate about the death penalty between Professor John Bessler and William G. Otis, a former federal prosecutor who served as a special counsel to President George H.W. Bush and is now an adjunct professor at Georgetown University Law Center.  Professor Colin Starger was the moderator.

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FROM THE CENTERS

CICL:

On Nov. 22, Aniceto Masferrer, professor of legal history at the University of Valencia in Spain, presented the Center for International and Comparative Law’s Stead Seminar titled “The Natural Rights Origins of Modern Constitutionalism.” Masferrer is the author most recently of Counter-Terrorism, Human Rights, and the Rule of Law (2013).

On Sept. 5, the Center for International and Comparative Law hosted a Stead Seminar on “Diversity, Justice and the Plurality of Legal Norms,” which was presented by Sergio Dellavalle, a professor at the University of Turin in Italy.

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CFCC:

The Sayra and Neil Meyerhoff Center for Families, Children and the Courts (CFCC), which is directed by Professor Barbara Babb, in January received a $43,172 grant from the Governor’s Office of Crime Control and Prevention. The funds will be used to hire an attorney to work with CFCC’s Truancy Court Program.

In December, the Truancy Court Program (TCP) completed its 18th session with an unprecedented 74 percent graduation rate for the fall. CFCC operated the TCP in seven schools in Baltimore, serving 147 students and their families, and three middle schools in Montgomery County, serving 37 students and their families. More than 20 UB students volunteered as TCP tutors to help truant students who were afraid to return to school because they lagged behind their peers academically. In addition, eight second- and third-year law students enrolled in the CFCC Student Fellows Program actively participated as members of the TCP team in eight schools.

On Dec. 5, CFCC held an event to celebrate the formation of a Maryland chapter of the Association of Family and Conciliation Courts.

On Dec. 2, Babb and CFCC Senior Fellow Gloria Danziger made a presentation about the Truancy Court Program to physicians, residents, social workers and other health professionals and students at Johns Hopkins Children’s Center. CFCC will work with Johns Hopkins to develop and implement programs for families and children in Baltimore City public schools.

The Truancy Court Program was the topic of a Nov. 27 article in the Montgomery County Gazette.

CFCC received a $50,000 grant from the Charles Crane Family Foundation to help operate the Truancy Court Program during the 2014-2015 academic year.

CFCC hosted a two-part program, “Family Law 101: Basics for the New Practitioner,” in September and October. Designed for beginning family law practitioners, the program provided information and guidance on a range of family law issues and featured judges, masters, members of the American Academy of Matrimonial Lawyers, and attorneys from the Family and Juvenile Law Section of the Maryland State Bar Association.

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FROM THE CLINICS

On Jan. 16, Maryland Court of Appeals Judge Shirley Watts swore in 75 clinic student-attorneys. Judge Watts swore in 69 clinic student-attorneys in August.

Danielle Cover, a visiting professor in the Family Law Clinic, and Sabrina Balgamwalla, a fellow in the Immigrant Rights Clinic, have accepted tenure-track teaching positions beginning next academic year. Cover will join the faculty of the University of Wyoming College of Law, where she will teach the Legal Services Clinic, torts and poverty law. Balgamwalla will join the faculty of the University of North Dakota School of Law, where she will teach a clinic with a focus on immigration law.

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RECENT GRADUATES

Rachel Snyder, J.D. `13, has accepted a job as a legislative assistant to Rep. Steny Hoyer (D-Maryland).

Michael Stone, J.D. `13, is a 2014 Equal Justice Works fellow. His project is supported by the Homeless Persons Representation Project in partnership with Hogan Lovells and the Lockheed Martin Corp. The goal of Stone’s work is to reduce veteran homelessness in rural Maryland by providing legal assistance and advocacy on Veterans Administration benefits through the use of technology that links “nonrural” pro bono attorneys to veterans in rural areas.rp. The goal of the program is to reduce veteran homelessness in rural Maryland by providing legal assistance and advocacy on VA benefits through the innovative use of technology linking nonrural pro bono attorneys to rural veterans. Congratulations Mike!

A University of Baltimore Law Review note by Alyssa Brown, J.D. `12, was cited in a report to Congress prepared by the Congressional Research Service.  Brown’s note addressed antitrust issues that can arise when pharmaceutical companies settle patent infringement cases.

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STUDENTS

Four of Professor Cassandra Havard’s banking law students — Dan Abrahmson, J.D.  `14, Pallavi Kachoria, J.D. `14, Timothy Hart, J.D. `14, and Edith Ngwaba, J.D. `15 — attended the annual meeting of Lend for America at the University of Pennsylvania in October. Lend for America helps student leaders create microfinance institutions on their campuses. The students drafted a funding proposal and plan to form an organization in the spring to raise interest in the project across the UB community.

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OTHER NEWS

Engineering News-Record included the John and Frances Angelos Law Center in its national 2013 “Best of the Best Projects” list, which, the magazine said, wraps up “a seven-month effort to identify the pinnacle of design and construction achievement in the U.S. among projects completed between July 2012 and June 2013.”

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Summer 2013

FROM THE CENTERS

CFCC: The Center for Families, Children and the Court’s Truancy Court Program ended its spring session with 98 graduates, who achieved a minimum 65 percent decrease in unexcused absences and/or “tardies” and demonstrated improved classroom behavior and academic performance. CFCC operated the program in eight Baltimore City and two Montgomery County public schools during the 2012-2013 school year and provided technical assistance in a third Montgomery County school.

More than 200 people attended CFCC’s fifth Urban Child Symposium, “A Holistic Approach to the Urban Child’s Trauma: From the Eyes of the Beholder,” on April 4. Rain Pryor — singer, actress, producer and daughter of the comedian Richard Pryor – gave the keynote address and spoke about her experience with trauma.  Panelists included professionals from the medical, judicial, social service, law enforcement and legal communities. A podcast of the symposium is available at http://law.ubalt.edu/centers/cfcc.

The center has received $83,751 for fiscal year 2014 from the Department of Family Administration’s Special Projects Grant Program of the Maryland Judiciary. The grant helps CFCC operate its Truancy Court Program in the Baltimore City Public Schools.

In addition, CFCC received a $15,000 grant from the Zanvyl and Isabelle Krieger Fund to support the Truancy Court Program.  The UB Foundation submitted the proposal on behalf of CFCC.

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CICL: The University of Baltimore School of Law and the Center for International and Comparative Law were the hosts May 21 to 23 to the annual meeting of the European-American Consortium for Legal Education and its academic colloquium on “Multi-level-governance and Federalism.” Professors C.J. Peters and Mortimer Sellers spoke at the colloquium and Professors James Maxeiner and Nienke Grossman chaired sessions.

On April 3, Professor Anne Peters, professor at the University of Basel and president of the European Society of International Law, gave the University of Baltimore Stead Lecture, “Transparency in International Law.”

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FROM THE CLINICS

In the spring semester, law students in the Community Development Clinic taught approximately 70 local entrepreneurs and nonprofit leaders about small business and social enterprise law. The students offered four free lectures to the public as part of their clinical education, honing their legal research and public-speaking skills while expanding the law school’s engagement with the local community.

Professors Leigh Goodmark and Jaime Lee co-presented on social justice and clinical teaching at the 2013 American Association of Law Schools Conference on Clinical Legal Education, held April 28 to May 1 in San Juan, Puerto Rico.

Professors Jaime Lee and Cassandra Havard are among eight faculty members selected to participate in an interdisciplinary, university-wide group focused on teaching entrepreneurship. The project is co-sponsored by UB’s Center for Entrepreneurship and Innovation and the Center for Learning, Teaching and Technology.

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FACULTY ACHIEVEMENTS

BARBARA BABB

Professor Babb, director of the Sayra and Neil Meyerhoff Center for Families, Children and the Courts, spoke May 31 at the 50th Anniversary Conference of the Association of Family and Conciliation Courts in Los Angeles. She discussed changes and trends in family courts.

Babb spoke at an April 19 symposium honoring the retirement of Maryland Chief Judge Robert M. Bell. She discussed Bell’s leadership in developing and implementing Maryland’s Family Divisions, which began operation in 1998.

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ERIC EASTON

Professor Easton was quoted in a May 3 Baltimore Sun story about a legal challenge to the Carroll County Board of Commissioners’ practice of opening meetings with prayers.

The Maryland State Bar Association is to publish Handbook on Intellectual Property Law, which includes a chapter by Easton titled “Copyright.”

In March, Easton completed a three-year term as chair of the Section on Legal Education and Admission to the Bar of the Maryland State Bar Association and became immediate past chair of the section.

On March 27, Easton gave a talk at the law school about his new book, Mobilizing the Press: Defending the First Amendment in the Supreme Court.  In April he was named Faculty Member of the Year by the Black Law Students Association.

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WENDY GERZOG

Professor Gerzog published two papers: “Valuing Fractional Interests in Art for Estate Tax Purposes,” 139 Tax Notes ___ (May 27, 2013) and “When Sommers Are Winters: Do Blanks Denote Revocability?” 138 Tax Notes 1477 (March 25, 2013).

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MICHELE GILMAN

Professor Gilman, director of the Civil Advocacy Clinic and co-director of the Center on Applied Feminism, presented “The Return of the Welfare Queen” at a symposium titled “Gender Matters: Women, Social Policy and the 2012 Election” on April 2 at American University Washington College of Law. The paper is to be published in a symposium volume of the Journal of Gender, Social Policy & the Law.

Gilman also facilitated the Scholarship Support Working Group at the AALS Conference on Clinical Legal Education and organized the works-in-progress sessions for the conference.

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LEIGH GOODMARK

Professor Goodmark took part in a May 2 HuffPost Live report about victims of domestic violence who are punished for speaking out.

In a March 26 op-ed in The Baltimore Sun, “Put blame for domestic homicides where it belongs: on the killers,” Goodmark said that instead of blaming the criminal justice system or abused women themselves for the harm they suffer, Americans need to look “at the myriad ways that we contribute to a climate in which violence against women continues at ridiculous rates.”

This spring, Goodmark was named Faculty Member of the Year by the Baltimore Women’s Bar Association and also received the Robert M. Bell Award from UBSPI.

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NIENKE GROSSMAN

Professor Grossman’s article “The Normative Legitimacy of International Courts” was selected for presentation at the Harvard/Stanford/Yale Junior Faculty Forum, which took place at Yale Law School on June 14 and 15.

Grossman also spoke on a panel on the International Court of Justice and Human Rights on May 31 at American University’s Washington College of Law.

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MICHAEL HIGGINBOTHAM

Professor Higginbotham and his new book, Ghosts of Jim Crow: Ending Racism in Post-Racial America, were the subject of an April 7 Daily Record story. (You will need a password to read the full article.)

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MARGARET JOHNSON

Professor Johnson’s most recent article, “A Home with Dignity: Domestic Violence and Property Rights,” was accepted for publication by Brigham Young University Law Review. Johnson presented the paper April 30 at the AALS Section on Clinical Legal Education Conference, San Juan, Puerto Rico.

Johnson presented a work in progress, “Reconstructing Gender Through Law: Security (Not Safety) Should Be The Goal of Domestic Violence Law,” at the Law and Society Annual Meeting in Boston on May 30.

Johnson has been appointed chair of the Planning Committee for the 2014 American Association of Law Schools (AALS) Section on Clinical Legal Education Conference, which is the largest section of the AALS and hosts the annual conference for clinical law professors.

Johnson was included in a list of the Top 25 Women Professors in Maryland by onlineschoolsmaryland.com.

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ELIZABETH KEYES

Professor Keyes was quoted on WAMU 88.5 June 7 as part of a program titled “Young ‘Dreamers’ Work to Shift Immigration Debate.” While the DREAM Act has repeatedly failed in Congress, young immigrants have succeeded in reframing the debate, Keyes said: “They really opened and shifted the conversation out of that stalemate we were in for years, since 2007.”

Keyes spoke on U.S. clinical legal education at the 2013 Law and Legal Education in the Americas Conference, held in June by the University of Detroit Mercy.

Keyes published two articles in May: “Maryland’s Views on Immigrants and Immigration” was published by the University of Baltimore Law Forum, and “Beyond Saints and Sinners: The Need for New Narratives in U.S. Immigration Court” was published by the Georgetown Immigration Law Journal.

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DIONNE KOLLER

Professor Koller was quoted in an April DC Bar cover story titled “Playing It Safe: Are Concussions Ruining Sports?” Koller said she believes that football can change its rules and still thrive. “The NFL … can change the expectations of the fans by evolving the game and emphasizing passing, catching, running, kicking, and strategy,” she said. “There’s a lot that goes on in that sport. It doesn’t have to be marginalized because it loses some of the violence. Look at [Olympic] hockey — people start appreciating the strategy and the team aspects when you take out the fights.”

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ROBERT LANDE

Professor Lande was one of three recipients of the 11th annual Jerry S. Cohen Award for the best antitrust scholarship of 2012. He received his award at the American Antitrust Institute’s Annual Conference on June 12 at the National Press Club in Washington.

Lande and John M. Connor wrote “Cartels as Rational Business Strategy: Crime Pays” (34 Cardozo L. Rev. 427) to analyze whether cartel sanctions are at the optimal level. The article demonstrated that the combined level of U.S. cartel sanctions — including private and government enforcement — has been only 9 percent to 21 percent as large as it should be to best protect potential victims of cartelization. It concludes: “Cartels are a crime that, on average, pays. … In fact, it pays very well.” Lande and Connor split an $8,000 prize and each received an original piece of artwork.

Professor Lande’s 2013 law review articles include “A Traditional and Textual Analysis of the Goals of Antitrust: Efficiency, Preventing Theft From Consumers, and Consumer Choice” in the Fordham Law Review and “Towards an Empirical Assessment of Private Antitrust Enforcement” (co-authored) in the Seattle Law Review. Lande also co-wrote “Comparative Negligence With Joint and Several Liability: The Best of Both Worlds” in the University of Baltimore Law Review’s new online publication, 1 University of Baltimore Law Review Online 1 (Dec. 13, 2012).

On June 18, Lande took part in an ABA webinar on Section 5 of the FTC Act. Click here to listen to the podcast.

Lande’s scholarly publications were the seventh-most-downloaded among antitrust law professors’ in the United States during 2012. His publications were downloaded 2,537 times in 2012, for a total of 12,899 lifetime downloads.

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JAMES MAXEINER

In a June 24 op-ed in The Baltimore Sun, “The fixable flaws of America’s civil justice system,” Professor Maxeiner compared the U.S. civil justice system to those of other developed nations and found ours wanting.

Professor Maxeiner contributed an op-ed to The Baltimore Sun on April 28. In “The Bavarian case for registering guns,” Maxeiner urged the United States to adopt Germany’s practice of licensing firearms the same way it requires motorists to register their vehicles.

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MICHAEL MEYERSON

Professor Meyerson was a guest June 17 on Dan Rodricks’ Midday program on WYPR, where he spoke on the 50th anniversary of the Supreme Court decision declaring Bible reading in public schools unconstitutional. Meyerson is the author of Endowed by Our Creator: The Birth of Religious Freedom in America. You can download and listen to the podcast here.

Meyerson published an op-ed in The Baltimore Sun on April 21 about cyberbullying. Wrote Meyerson: “Cellphones and the Internet have not only altered the way we communicate, they have changed the way we can injure one another. The telecommunications revolution has created the capability of causing far greater harm to children than the bullying many of us remember from when we were young.”

The op-ed was pegged to “Grace’s Law,” a measure passed by both houses of Maryland’s legislature and signed by Gov. Martin O’Malley. It is named after 15-year-old Grace McComas, who in April 2012 took her life after a year of online bullying and torment.

Sun reporter and columnist Susan Reimer mentioned Meyerson in her May 1 article “Journey in grief leads to new protections in bullying.” Wrote Reimer: “Meyerson worked to craft a bill that would respect the First Amendment protections of free speech while giving law enforcement a tool to use against anyone using electronic communication to threaten or inflict emotional distress on a minor.”

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AUDREY MCFARLANE

Professor McFarlane spoke at a symposium at Fordham Law School in honor of the 40th anniversary of the Fordham Urban Law Journal.  Her panel was titled “What Is Urban Law Today?”

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JANE MURPHY

Professor Murphy’s legal scholarship was cited in a June 12 New York Times online op-ed titled “Is Forced Fatherhood Fair?” The article concludes: “Policies that punish men for accidental pregnancies also punish those children who must manage a lifelong relationship with an absent but legal father.”

On May 13, Murphy took part in Marc Steiner’s radio show on WEAA 88.9 FM, which focused on how society views domestic violence. Murphy noted that “we have historically seen family violence as involving different roots, different social causes, different behavior from violence against strangers,” but in examining recent cases, “we are beginning to see that those same patterns of control and criminal behavior that result in violence in the family also put strangers at risk.”

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ELIZABETH SAMUELS

Professor Samuels’ article “Surrender and Subordination: Birth Mothers and Adoption Law Reform” was published in the Michigan Journal of Gender & Law at the University of Michigan Law School.  When the almost-final version was posted on SSRN, it hit Top 10 download lists for four SSRN e-journals.

In April, Samuels testified in favor of an adoption law reform bill before the Ohio Senate Committee on Medicaid, Health and Human Services. In March she submitted written testimony to the Ohio House Judiciary Committee.

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MORTIMER SELLERS

Professor Sellers’ article “International Legal Positivism” was published in the Proceedings of the 106th Annual Meeting of the American Society of International Law.

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COLIN STARGER

Professor Starger was quoted in a May 3 Daily Record story about the National Lawyers Guild and its support of the Poor People’s March from Baltimore to Washington, which was held on May 11. “From the earliest days, the NLG supported the New Deal and Social Security,” Starger said of the guild, which was founded in 1937. “Our position now is not to renege on the New Deal.” (You will need a Daily Record account to read the full story.)

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CHARLES TIEFER

Professor Tiefer was interviewed for a June 26 story in The New York Times about how industrial disasters can result in tensions between criminal and accident investigators. “Criminal investigators are not above trying to win convictions on crimes that may seem peripheral to the cause of the workplace deaths, like lying under oath or destroying documents,” Tiefer said.

Tiefer was quoted in a June 20 Bloomberg News story about the growing use of contractors to vet job-seekers for security clearances. “The notion that government officials have the final decision about granting or denying clearances is a mere fig leaf, and a pretty small one at that,” Tiefer said in the article, which appeared in The Washington Post Business section. Tiefer is a former member of the U.S. Commission on Wartime Contracting.

Tiefer also was quoted in a June 12 Bloomberg News article about the growing number of U.S. jobs that require top-secret security clearances. About 1.4 million Americans held such clearances as of October and roughly a half-million of them were hired by contractors instead of federal agencies, the story said. Contractors even perform background investigations that were once conducted by the FBI and the Office of Personnel Management, Tiefer said.

Tiefer spoke to Federal News Radio on May 21 about the alleged targeting of right-wing groups by the Internal Revenue Service.

On May 19, Tiefer was quoted in a Washington Times story about the seizure of Associated Press phone records on Capitol Hill.

Tiefer was quoted in an April 17 Bloomberg News article about Pentagon overpayments to Supreme Foodservice, a contractor in Afghanistan. Said Tiefer: “Supreme Foodservice gouged the taxpayer big-time. The government offered to pay Supreme all its costs and overhead, plus a generous profit. Instead of taking the government’s sensible offer, Supreme overcharged massively on the blatantly fictitious notion that it deserved a made-up and highly inflated ‘market’ rate.”

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BYRON WARNKEN

To mark the retirement of the Hon. Robert M. Bell, chief judge of the Maryland Court of Appeals, Professor Warnken, along with 50 law students and lawyers, compiled a 250-page book covering Judge Bell’s 209 criminal law opinions – majority, concurring and dissent – during his 23 years on the Court of Appeals.

On June 1, Warnken took 16 UB law students to the annual fundraising event for Mentoring Male Teens in the Hood, an organization that serves 60 Baltimore City African-American males age 8 to 18. The keynote speaker was Professor Charles J. Ogletree Jr., the Jesse Climenko Professor of Law at Harvard Law School and the director of the Charles Hamilton Houston Institute for Race & Justice.

Warnken’s work Maryland Criminal Procedure: A Treatise is scheduled for publication in October. The three-volume work, which he began in 2010, contains 34 chapters and 2,000 pages. Warnken says he designed the treatise as “one-stop shopping” for Maryland’s judges, prosecutors, defense counsel and law students.  A book-signing event is planned for late October at the law school.

Warnken spoke to WBAL Radio on April 29 about the fallout from recent federal gang corruption indictments following reports of gang activity at the Baltimore City jail. Corrections officers who take, and fail, a polygraph test could lose their jobs but are not likely to be prosecuted based on the results, Warnken said.

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ADJUNCT FACULTY

NEIL DILLOFF

Dilloff, a partner at DLA Piper’s Baltimore office, served as a panelist at a Stanford Law School symposium in April titled “The Future of Legal Education and the Legal Profession.” His talk, “Bridging the Gap Between Legal Education and the Practice of Law,” is to be published as an article in the Stanford Law & Policy Review.

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THE HON. JOHN GOSSART

The Hon. John F. Gossart Jr., U.S. Immigration Judge of the Baltimore Immigration Court, will retire in August after 32 years on the bench and 42 years of federal service. Judge Gossart has taught immigration law at UB Law for 17 years. He plans to continue teaching at the law school in retirement.

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ALAN NEMETH

On April 10, Nemeth took part in a panel discussion – “Trending Topics in Animal Law” – at the University of the District of Columbia David A. Clarke School of Law. Rep. Sam Farr (D-Calif.) was the main speaker. Nemeth talked about the intersection of animal law and family law. He pointed out that 25 states and the District of Columbia have passed domestic violence bills designed to protect pets and that family law could develop to include joint custody and visitation of pets.

Nemeth’s book v., Case Law, Concepts, & American Society was published this year.

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SPECIAL SECTION: UB LAW PROFESSORS ON U.S. SUPREME COURT RULINGS

Click here to read UB Law professors’ articles, op-eds and blog posts on the Supreme Court’s recent rulings.

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STAFF

JERNEE BRAMBLE

Bramble, associate director of law placement, was chosen as June’s “Member Spotlight” for WALRAA, the Washington Area Legal Recruitment Administrators Association. Bramble serves as the 2013 co-chair of the association’s Diversity Committee.

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CLEMENT LAU

The CALA Committee for the Jing Liao Award for the Best Research in All Media chose Clement Chu-Sing Lau as the 2013 recipient of the Jing Liao Award. Lau, associate director for technical services and administration in the law library, was selected for his publication “American Public Library Law (美国公共图书馆法研究),” which appeared in the Tushuguan zazhi (图书馆杂志), a library journal in China. The award came with a $500 prize.

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ALUMNI

RONALD J. ALLEN,  J.D. ‘02

SuperiorReview, a Houston-based document-review firm, has named Allen regional sales director, in charge of expanding and developing the firm’s service offerings. He will also extend the company’s reach into targeted regions, focusing on large corporations and law firms involved in global litigation.

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BRIAN P. DARMODY, J.D. ‘81

Darmody has been named associate vice president for corporate and foundation relations at the University of Maryland. He is charged with leading university-wide efforts to develop strategic partnerships between the university and the corporate and foundation community.

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BOB VAN GALOUBANDI, J.D. ‘05

Galoubandi has been elected a partner of Rosenberg Martin Greenberg LLP. Galoubandi represents banks, lending institutions, private lenders and businesses in all aspects of real estate lending and troubled loan workouts. He was named a Maryland Super Lawyers Rising Star for Bankruptcy and Creditor/Debtor Rights in 2013.

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LAWRENCE S. GREENBERG, J.D. ‘94

In May, Greenberg was inducted as the 60th president of the Maryland Association for Justice (formerly the Maryland Trial Lawyers Association).

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JONAS JACOBSON, J.D. ‘00

Jacobson has joined the new government-relations firm of Perry, White, Ross & Jacobson in Annapolis.

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GREG P. JIMENO, J.D. ‘99

In June, Jimeno was named the 82nd president of the Anne Arundel Bar Association.

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ROBERT KASUNIC, J.D. ‘92

In April, Kasunic was appointed associate register of copyrights and director of registration policy and practice at the U.S. Copyright Office. Previously he was deputy general counsel of the Copyright Office. In his new role, Kasunic serves as the principal adviser to the register on legal and business issues relating to the administration of the national registration system. He will also play a major role in implementing the office’s forthcoming Compendium of Copyright Office Practices.

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BARRY LEVIN, J.D. ‘84

Levin has been named managing partner at Saul Ewing LLP. He is the first managing partner to be chosen from the Baltimore office, according to the Baltimore Business Journal.

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JIM LIANG, J.D. ’06, LL.M IN TAXATION ‘07

Liang has been elected a partner of Rosenberg Martin Greenberg LLP, representing individuals and entities in federal and state tax controversies and litigation. Previously Liang was employed as a certified public accountant. Liang also volunteers with the Maryland Defense Force, which provides supplemental professional and technical support to the Maryland Military Department and the Maryland National Guard. Liang was honored as a Maryland Super Lawyers Rising Star in 2012 and in 2013 for Tax, and was recently named to the Lawyers of Color Inaugural Hot List for 2013.

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JOSEPH PERSICO, J.D. ‘75

Persico, managing partner of Rosenn, Jenkins & Greenwald LLP in Wilkes-Barre, Pa., was selected to the Pennsylvania Super Lawyers list for 2013 in the area of real estate law.

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KEVIN SHEA, J.D. ‘91

Shea was recently promoted to administrator of the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service. He had served as acting administrator since June 2012.

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TARA SHOEMAKER, J.D. ‘07

Shoemaker, principal of Tara Shoemaker & Associates in Frederick, received the Small Firm Award in the Pro Bono Resource Center of Maryland’s annual Maryland Pro Bono Service Awards.

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BARBARA J. WILKINS, J.D. ‘00

Wilkins has been appointed government relations officer for Anne Arundel County by County Executive Laura Neuman.

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STUDENTS

Tiffany Fountaine, J.D. ’14, was named to Lawyers of Color’s Inaugural Hot List, which recognizes early- to mid-career attorneys under 40 who are excelling in the legal profession.

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OTHER NEWS

Peter Angelos, LL.B. ’61, donated $1 million to the School of Law for the newly named Fannie Angelos Program for Academic Excellence, formerly the Baltimore Scholars program — an intensive, one-on-one approach to improving diversity in legal education and in the wider legal community. Fannie Angelos, Peter Angelos’ sister, received her LL.B. from UB Law in 1951.

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In a June 20 op-ed that appeared in The Baltimore Sun, Stephen Awalt, J.D. ‘85, discussed the revitalization of the Mount Royal corridor and hailed the new Angelos Law Center, which he called a “beautifully designed and executed capstone structure.”

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In a May 7 citybizlist.com article, “Buildings That Shape Us,” Baltimore businessman Oz Bengur – husband of Associate Dean Vicki Schultz — wrote that Baltimore should follow the lead of UB President Robert L. Bogomolny and construct innovative buildings that, like the new law center, will shape the city’s future.
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In an April 10 architectural review of the new John and Frances Angelos Law Center, The Baltimore Brew called the building “smart and stimulating.”

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The Baltimore Sun also reported on the new law center, saying: “Like American jurisprudence, the University of Baltimore’s new $114 million law school is complicated and thoughtful.” A photo gallery accompanies the story.

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BY THE NUMBERS

As of July 1, the University of Baltimore School of Law was ranked No. 37 on the Social Science Research Network (SSRN) Top 350 U.S. Law Schools download list. In the previous 12 months, scholarly works by UB Law professors were downloaded 19,086 times.

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ALUMNI: STAY IN TOUCH!

Are you a UB graduate with a new job? A promotion? Keep us posted about your professional news by completing the form found here. All submissions will be verified by School of Law staff and may be edited for length and style. Please provide your graduation year and the type of degree you earned. For questions, please contact us at lawaccolades@ubalt.edu.

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PLEASE DONATE TO UB

The support of our dedicated alumni and friends is crucial to the School of Law’s success. Please consider giving to the School of Law Annual Fund and thank you for your commitment to the University of Baltimore School of Law.

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Spring 2013

Welcome to the second issue of ACCOLADES, the University of Baltimore School of Law’s in-house newsletter. We aim to keep you informed about activities at the law school and about the successes of our faculty, centers and clinics, students and staff. Please send your news to Hope Keller, director of communications, at hkeller@ubalt.edu.

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FROM DEAN RONALD WEICH

In an op-ed published in The Daily Record on Feb. 21, Dean Weich addressed concerns about upheaval in legal education and in the legal marketplace and described UB Law as well-positioned to flourish despite the changes. Wrote Weich: “Increasingly, lawyers work in tandem with other professionals on multi-faceted assignments. They must be fluent in the sophisticated information technology that dominates both litigation and commercial matters today. They are often judged — and compensated — according to the outcomes they achieve rather than the hours they tally. And in this fast-paced, competitive atmosphere, law school graduates don’t always have the luxury of on-the-job training. Not all law schools will successfully adapt to this brave new world, but I’m confident the University of Baltimore will do so.”

In an op-ed in the March 10 issue of the Baltimore Sun, Weich discussed the filibuster and emphasized that, when used responsibly, it is “consistent with other features of the federal government, such as bicameralism and the presidential veto power, mechanisms to cool momentary passions and ensure careful review before the national government acts.”

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FACULTY ACHIEVEMENTS

JOSÉ ANDERSON

At the annual meeting of the American Association of Law Schools, held in January in New Orleans, Professor Anderson was elected national chair of the nearly 800-member section on litigation for 2013-2014.

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BARBARA BABB

Professor Babb reports: “In connection with its [$300,000] grant from AT&T, the Center for Families, Children and the Courts (CFCC) held a Truancy Court Program (TCP) stakeholders’ meeting on Feb. 12. Nearly 50 participants attended, representing the business community, government agencies, Baltimore City public schools and private foundations, among others. CFCC has begun the spring TCP session in eight Baltimore City public schools and three Montgomery County middle schools. In addition, according to CFCC’s data analysis of the fall 2012 TCP session, the TCP and its mentoring program served a total of 134 students and their families. More than half of these students (57 percent) graduated from the program, based on a minimum 65 percent decrease in unexcused absences and/or tardies, as well as improved classroom behavior and grades.”

She continues: “After receiving a UB21 Catalyst grant, CFCC, in partnership with the UB Integrated Arts Program, is operating a ‘Kids and the Arts’ program in two TCP schools.”

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JOHN BESSLER

Professor Bessler spoke Dec. 8 to the 2nd Oslo International Symposium on Capital Punishment. He discussed his book Cruel and Unusual: The American Death Penalty and the Founders’ Eighth Amendment (Boston: Northeastern University Press, 2012). The book — awarded a “silver” designation in the Independent Publisher Book Awards in the category of U.S. history — will be released in paperback in 2013.

On Feb. 14, Bessler provided written testimony to Maryland’s Senate Judicial Proceedings Committee about the repeal of the state’s death penalty.

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GILDA DANIELS

Professor Daniels was the author of an op-ed that appeared in The Baltimore Sun on Feb. 27. She argued that the Supreme Court must not roll back voting rights, specifically Section 5 of the Voting Rights Act, which requires “covered jurisdictions” to get federal approval, or “pre-clearance,” of voting changes before they can implement them. The Supreme Court heard arguments in in Shelby County, Alabama v. Holder on Feb. 27.

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ERIC EASTON

Professor Easton has released a new book, Mobilizing the Press: Defending the First Amendment in the Supreme Court (Vandeplas Publishing).

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GARRETT EPPS

On Jan. 15, Professor Epps wrote in The Atlantic that the Seventh Circuit should vacate an opinion written by Judge Richard Posner, who, writing for a 2-1 majority, struck down, on Second Amendment grounds, Illinois’ statute about carrying a loaded, accessible firearm anywhere outside the home. The ABA Journal noted the article, in which Epps took Posner to task for the “flippant” tone of his opinion striking down the gun law.

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WENDY GERZOG

Professor Gerzog published two articles recently: “Valuation Discounting and the Lottery Cases” (137 Tax Notes 917, Nov. 19, 2012) and “Wimmer Wins FLP Annual Exclusions” (138 Tax Notes 489, Jan. 28, 2013). In November, Gerzog was listed among the top 25 U.S. tax professors in two SSRN categories: all-time downloads and recent downloads (within the past 12 months: http://taxprof.typepad.com/taxprof_blog/2012/11/ssr.html).

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MICHELE GILMAN

Professor Gilman recently published two papers: “The Poverty Defense” (47 Univ. of Richmond L. Rev. 495, 2013) and “The Class Differential in Privacy Law (77 Brooklyn L. Rev. 1389, 2012).

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LEIGH GOODMARK

Professor Goodmark presented a talk titled “Rethinking State Intervention in Intimate Partner Violence” at the American Association of Law Schools’ annual meeting in New Orleans on Jan. 7.

Goodmark’s book A Troubled Marriage was one of five titles selected for inclusion in Choice‘s Outstanding Academic Title list for 2013. The titles appeared in January’s Choice magazine.

Goodmark’s paper “Transgender People, Intimate Partner Abuse, and the Legal System,” was cited in a Jan. 25 Huffington Post article.

Goodmark was quoted in a Time magazine article on Feb. 27 about the Violence Against Women Act and the limitations of law enforcement approaches to protecting abused women.

Goodmark received this year’s Judge Robert M. Bell Award for Leadership in Public Interest. The award is given annually at the UBSPI auction to an individual in the legal community who has exemplified a commitment to the public good.

Goodmark contributed an op-ed to the March 27 issue of The Baltimore Sun. Written in response to a Sun article about a recent spike in domestic violence, Goodmark said: “Coverage of domestic violence tends to assume that there is some miracle combination of police, prosecutorial and court response that could prevent these deaths from happening. But the truth is that no such magical formula exists. Social science research has told us for decades that the criminal justice response to domestic violence is largely ineffectual in terms of decreasing overall rates of domestic violence.”

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NIENKE GROSSMAN

Last year, Professor Grossman served as a legal adviser to the government of Chile in a maritime dispute (Peru v. Chile) in the International Court of Justice and in December attended oral hearings in The Hague, Netherlands.

Grossman spoke at the annual Women and the Law Conference in San Diego in early February.

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MICHAEL HIGGINBOTHAM

Professor Higginbotham published an op-ed in the Baltimore Sun on Jan. 24 entitled “Ghosts of Jim Crow Haunt Us Still.” His new book, Ghosts of Jim Crow: Ending Racism in Post-Racial America, was published March 18.

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GILBERT HOLMES

Professor Holmes has been selected as dean of the University of La Verne College of Law in Ontario, Calif. He will begin his tenure at La Verne this summer.

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DIONNE KOLLER

Professor Koller published an op-ed in The Baltimore Sun on Jan. 20. The article, pegged to cyclist Lance Armstrong’s admission that he used performance-enhancing drugs, urged that the regulations governing Olympic movement athletics in the United States be extended to college and professional sports.

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ROBERT LANDE

On Dec. 3, Professor Lande addressed the annual meeting of the American Antitrust Institute. His talk, “Cartels as Rational Business Strategy: Crime Pays,” was based on an article published in December in the Cardozo Law Review.

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KENNETH LASSON

Professor Lasson spoke at a conference at Goodenough College, University of London, on Dec. 2. The title of his presentation was “Antisemitism on Campus.” The conference was sponsored by the Journal for the Study of Antisemitism.

Lasson contributed an op-ed to The Baltimore Sun on Feb. 28 urging President Obama to grant clemency to Jonathan Pollard, who was convicted in 1985 of providing classified information to Israel and sentenced to life in prison.

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MATTHEW LINDSAY

Professor Lindsay’s article “Immigration, Sovereignty, and the Constitution of Foreignness” was published in February in the Connecticut Law Review.

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MAX OPPENHEIMER

Professor Oppenheimer served as a judge for the Emmy Awards and for the University of Maryland, College Park’s Inventor of the Year award. He also produced several articles recently:

“Patentable Subject Matter and Separation of Powers” was the lead article in Vanderbilt Journal of Entertainment and Technology Law (Vol. 15, No. 1).

“Four Things Every Inventor Should Do by March 15” is scheduled for publication in the online version of the Oklahoma Journal of Law and Technology. The paper was recently listed on SSRN’s Top Ten download list for IRPN: Innovation & Intellectual Property Law & Policy (Topic), Innovation Law & Policy eJournal, Intellectual Property: Patent Law eJournal, Law & Society: Legislation eJournal, Legal History eJournal, and Legislation & Statutory Interpretation eJournal. Oppenheimer is working on a follow-up article titled “Four Things Every Inventor Should Do Now That It’s After March 15.”

Another article, “Zero and the Rise of Technological Lawmaking,” has been accepted for publication by the Pace Law Review.

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ROBERT ROTH

In December, Adjunct Professor Roth presented arguments to the Supreme Court in Sebelius v. Auburn Regional Medical Center, No. 11-1231. The case was covered by several media outlets, including Politico.com. The Supreme Court ruled against Roth’s client on Jan. 22.

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MORTIMER SELLERS

Professor Sellers has been elected a member of the Association Internationale de Droit Constitutionnel (International Association of Constitutional Law).

Sellers has been selected, with Professor Stephan Kirste of the University of Salzburg, as the general editor of the Encyclopedia of the Philosophy of Law and Social Philosophy. The multi-volume encyclopedia will be a joint production of Springer Verlag and the International Society for the Philosophy of Law and Social Philosophy.

Sellers also published an article, “The Justice of International Law,” in 3 International Legal Theory 297 (2012).

Sellers is planning two trips in 2013: In July he will be a plenary speaker at the biennial conference of the International Association for the Philosophy of Law and Social Philosophy, to be held in Belo Horizonte, Brazil, where he will deliver a lecture on “Law, Reason and Emotion.” He has also been invited to speak in October at the European University Institute and the Alberaccio Macchiavelli to honor the 500th anniversary of the publication of Niccolò Machiavelli’s The Prince.

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COLIN STARGER

Professor Starger is currently working on the SCOTUS Mapping Project, which will map Supreme Court doctrine in a variety of cases. His map detailing the commerce clause debate in the recent Affordable Care Act decision can be found here.

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CHARLES TIEFER

In February, Tiefer was widely quoted after the American Federation of Government Employees released a paper he wrote about savings that could be found by reducing government service contracts. Among the outlets that quoted Tiefer were The Washington Post, the Federal Daily, Federal News Radio, Government Executive and the Federal Times.

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STUDENT ACHIEVEMENTS

3L student Jess Emerson is a recipient of an Equal Justice Works fellowship. Every year, 45 to 55 two-year fellowships are awarded to lawyers committed to developing and leading innovative social justice projects. Emerson’s project focuses on implementing Maryland’s “vacating convictions” law, which allows survivors of sex trafficking who have been convicted of prostitution offenses to have those convictions vacated.

In January, UB Law’s National Moot Court team of Ellery Johannessen, Vincent Jackson and Jeffrey Bernstein placed fifth overall out of 150-plus teams. The team was coached by Brad Peabody of the Appellate Division of the Office of the Public Defender.

In February, UB Law’s National Telecommunications Moot Court Team — Meredith Pendergrass, Alison Graham and Anjali Rajasekhar — advanced to the semi-final round before being eliminated in a very close argument.

Ebony Thompson, 3L, received a 2012 Marjorie Cook Endowed Scholars Program award, which is given to women graduate students studying law or public policy who are committed to empowering women and advancing their social status through careers in law or as policymakers.

Katie Gallagher, 2L, testified March 7 before the Judiciary Committee of the Maryland House of Delegates on HB 396 on a bill to prevent cyberbullying. Gallagher was asked to testify based on the research she conducted for a comment she is writing for the UB Law Forum. Professor Michael Meyerson, who helped draft HB 396, also testified before the committee.

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OTHER NEWS

Assistant Dean Jill Green and Professor Michael Higginbotham will be sworn in to the Supreme Court in April on the motion of Professor José Anderson.

Also, Green was elected to the MSBA Section on Legal Education and Admission to the Bar of the Maryland State Bar Association and the Steering Committee for the Pro Bono Coordinating Council.

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The University of Baltimore School of Law is among the 23.6 percent (one of 47) ABA-approved law schools deemed fully transparent as of March 4 by Law School Transparency, a nonprofit legal education policy organization. The Transparency Index measures how law school websites address both voluntary transparency standards and the mandated ABA Standard 509 consumer information. To view UB’s criteria on the Transparency Index, click the link and filter the spreadsheet by “Baltimore.”

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EVENTS

Thomas Perez, assistant attorney general of the Civil Rights Division of the U.S. Department of Justice, spoke at UB Law on Jan. 23. His lecture was titled “Protecting Democracy’s Fundamental Civil Right: The Right to Vote.” President Obama last month nominated Perez to be the U.S. secretary of labor.

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On Jan. 30, Maryland Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown, Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake and Baltimore Police Commissioner Anthony Batts were among several officials who spoke at a town hall meeting at UB Law. Public safety and gun control were the primary topics of the event, which drew a standing-room-only crowd in the moot court room.

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The sixth annual Applied Feminism Conference was held March 7 and 8. Sen. Amy Klobuchar (D-Minn.) – the wife of Professor John Bessler – gave the keynote address. The focus of the conference was applied feminism and families.
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On March 12, the 2013 Langenberg Lecture was presented by Harold Hongju Koh, Sterling Professor of International Law at Yale Law School and former legal adviser to the U.S. Department of State. Koh’s lecture was titled “Teaching Globalization.” The University System of Maryland Langenberg Lecture Series, established in honor of Chancellor Emeritus Donald N. Langenberg, presents fresh perspectives on education in America and is awarded to a USM institution every year.

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The University of Baltimore Law Review and the University of Baltimore School of Law Criminal Law Association on March 28 held a half-day symposium, “Privacy Rights and Proactive Investigations: Emerging Constitutional Issues in Law Enforcement.” Among the panelists were Baltimore Police Commissioner Anthony Batts, former Commissioner Frederick Bealefeld, state’s attorneys Gregg Bernstein and Scott Shellenberger, and Nancy Forster, former public defender for the state of Maryland.

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Greetings!

Welcome to the first issue of ACCOLADES, the University of Baltimore School of Law’s e-newsletter. We aim to keep you informed about activities at the School of Law and about the successes of our faculty, centers and clinics, students, staff and alumni.

NEWS

July 2012 Maryland Bar Results

The 252 UB grads who took the Maryland bar exam for the first time passed at a rate of ­85 percent, while the pass rate for all 276 UB grads who took the exam was 82 percent. UB’s pass rates exceeded the rate for all law school graduates in the nation who took the Maryland exam for the first time (81 percent), as well as that for all Maryland bar takers (76 percent). Moreover, UB’s pass rate was third-best among the nine law schools in the Maryland, Washington, D.C., and northern Virginia region, behind Georgetown and George Washington.

A Conversation with U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder 

The School of Law was host to U.S. Attorney General Eric H. Holder Jr. on Nov. 8, providing audience members the chance to listen to a conversation between Holder and Ronald Weich, dean of the School of Law. Click here to access the video.

UB Team Takes Second Place in Moot Court Competition

Professor Byron Warnken reports that the University of Baltimore took second place in the Region III Moot Court Competition, held in November at UB’s School of Law.  The University of Pennsylvania School of Law took first place in the event, which drew teams from seven law schools: University of Baltimore, Villanova, Pittsburgh, Maryland, Temple, Georgetown and Pennsylvania. The members of UB’s winning team are Ellery Johannessen, Vincent Jackson and Jeffrey Bernstein. Next up for the team: the “nationals,” to be held in New York in January.

CENTERS & CLINICS

Center for Families, Children and the Courts

UB’s Center for Families, Children and the Courts’ Truancy Court Program received a $300,000 contribution from AT&T’s Aspire program. The contribution will be used to help develop, implement and analyze the Truancy Court Program in four Baltimore City schools that serve eighth and/or ninth graders.  … The Sept. 5 issue of the Urbanite included an article on truancy that featured the Truancy Court Program and Professor Barbara Babb, director of the center. … The program also was named a “Bright Idea” by the Ash Center for Democratic Governance at the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University. The Bright Ideas initiative recognizes and shares innovative government programs and partnerships that aim to provide reliable solutions to widespread problems. A team of policy experts from academia and the public sector selected the Truancy Court Program, one of 111 programs highlighted nationwide. … The center also received a $60,000 grant for the Truancy Court Program from the Baltimore-based Charles Crane Family Foundation. The Crane Foundation—whose first grant, in 2004, allowed the center to launch the initiative—has funded the program every year since its inception.

Center for International and Comparative Law

UB’s Center for International and Comparative Law held its 2012 John Sumner Stead Lecture on Nov. 13 at the John and Frances Angelos Law Center. The lecture, “Drones, Kill Lists, and American Values,” was presented by Scott Shane, a national security reporter in the New York Times’ Washington bureau. Shane has written extensively about targeted killing under the Obama administration and about the debate over torture during the Bush administrations. For his 2007 articles on interrogation, written with several colleagues, Shane was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize. More recently, he has written about CIA drone strikes in Pakistan, the American-born radical cleric Anwar al-Awlaki and the prosecution of people alleged to have leaked classified information.

Innocence Project Clinic

The Innocence Project Clinic‘s application for funding under the FY 2012 Post Conviction DNA Testing Assistance Program was approved for award. The program is a collaborative effort among the Baltimore Police Department, the State’s Attorney’s Office and the University of Baltimore and will run from Jan. 1, 2013, to Dec. 31, 2014. The project aims to ensure that individuals convicted of violent crimes in Maryland state courts who claim factual innocence that can be addressed through post-conviction DNA testing or the analysis of Combined DNA Index System data are identified and properly represented by counsel.

Immigrant Rights Clinic

Director Elizabeth Keyes reports that student-attorneys Ben Messer and Chris Simmons won asylum for a woman from Cameroon; Jacob Finkelstein, Yanna Panagopoulos, James Robinson and Farnoush Samadnejad filed applications for two people seeking asylum from Cameroon and Rwanda; Hayley Tamburello and Julia Fedorova worked in both family and immigration courts to launch the process for two immigrant teens from Central America to find permanent status in the United States; Sophie Le submitted a law-enforcement-endorsed petition for a domestic violence survivor from India; and Mark Desierto found potential relief for a Latino man who feared deportation, which would separate him from his U.S.-citizen children. The IRC student-attorneys also collaborated on developing a policy brief for the Public Justice Center examining the scope of wage theft in Maryland.

Civil Advocacy Clinic

The Civil Advocacy Clinic–taught by Professors Michele Gilman, Daniel Hatcher and Kathryn Loncarich–continues to expose students to a wide array of substantive practice areas and to build their lawyering and critical thinking skills. Jami Lookabill successfully convinced a family court master to reduce an onerous child support order entered against a low-income father who is raising his children; Adam Sindler successfully defended a tenant from a $12,000 lawsuit brought against her by a former landlord seeking to pin repair costs on her; Heather Messick helped a client get her security deposit returned from her landlord; Katie Kerner argued before the Board of Appeals that her client did not commit gross misconduct to disqualify her from unemployment insurance; Ryan Stoker drafted a brief for an unemployment insurance appeal before the Court of Special Appeals; Drew Goodwin settled a case with GEICO relieving his client from all liability related to a car accident; Caitlin Evans obtained special education services on behalf of a high school student with special needs; Lauren Bell drafted a complex set of pleadings in opposition to a motion to compel arbitration by a for-profit school that the clinic’s client is suing.

FACULTY ACCOMPLISHMENTS

Professor John Bessler spoke Dec. 8 at the 2nd Oslo International Symposium on Capital Punishment. He discussed his book Cruel and Unusual: The American Death Penalty and the Founders’ Eighth Amendment (Boston: Northeastern University Press, 2012). The book, which was awarded a silver designation in the Independent Publisher Book Awards in the category of U.S. history, will be released in paperback in 2013.

Professor Gilda Daniels served as a featured guest speaker at the discussion group A.C.T.O.R. (A Continuing Talk on Race) on Nov. 4 and discussed voter suppression and the 2012 election.

Professor Eric Easton has a new book, Mobilizing the Press: Defending the First Amendment in the Supreme Court (Vandeplas Publishing).

Professor Garrett Epps’ essay “U.S. Supreme Court—Law Prof Sees Emergence of ‘Post-Scalia Era’ and Impatience with Originalism” was featured in ABA Journal Law News Now on Sept. 13. Epps appeared on WYPR’s Midday with Dan Rodricks on Sept. 24 to discuss his new book, Wrong and Dangerous: Ten Right-Wing Myths About Our Constitution. Also on Sept. 24, the Baltimore Sun published “Rodricks: Conservatives create constitutional myths. Legal scholar says interpretations of the law are ‘wrong and dangerous.’”

Professor Wendy Gerzog’s article “Another Turn with Turner” appeared in 136 Tax Notes 1613 (Sept. 24, 2012). Her article “Not All Defined Value Clauses Are Equal” was accepted for publication in 10 Pitt. Tax Rev. (2012). Another article, “Valuation Discounting and the Lottery Cases,” was published in 137 Tax Notes 917 (Nov. 19, 2012). Also, in November Gerzog was listed in the SSRN’s Top 25 U.S. Tax Professors in two categories: all-time downloads and recent downloads.

Professor Michele Gilman became president of the board of the Public Justice Center in June. Gilman is the director of the Civil Advocacy Clinic and co-director of the Center on Applied Feminism.

Professor Leigh Goodmark’s “Transgender People, Intimate Partner Abuse, and the Legal System,” published in the Harvard Civil Rights-Civil Liberties Review, was the focus of the Harvard journal’s annual Fall Colloquium, held Nov. 5. The colloquium, supported by the Harvard Law School Milbank Tweed Student Conference Fund, invited, along with Goodmark, various leaders in the field to discuss in a plenary session the significance and potential impact of her work. Goodmark also was a keynote speaker in October at the University of Buffalo School of Law’s Conference on Intimate Partner Violence. Goodmark is a nationally recognized scholar and practitioner in the areas of domestic violence, marriage, and families and children, as well as an analyst of issues raised by gender. She is currently the president of the Clinical Legal Education Association as well as the co-founder and co-director of the Center on Applied Feminism at the University of Baltimore School of Law.

President Obama’s nomination of federal magistrate Paul Grimm to a seat on the U.S. District Court in Maryland was confirmed by the Senate on Dec. 3. Judge Grimm is a long-serving member of the UB adjunct faculty.

Professor Nienke Grossman’s work in progress, A New Approach to the Normative Legitimacy of International Courts,” was selected for presentation at the American Society of International Law’s Annual Research Forum at the University of Georgia in mid-October. The same work was selected for presentation at a joint workshop of the American Society of International Law and the European Society of International Law’s International Legal Theory interest groups at Cambridge University’s Lauterpacht Centre in September.

Professor Dan Hatcher appeared in a Sept. 11 Daily Record article, “State can keep foster child’s survivor benefits, CSA holds.” Hatcher filed the petition for certiorari to the Court of Appeals on Oct. 12 and is awaiting a decision on whether the Court of Appeals will hear the case. Hatcher also was quoted extensively in an Oct. 23 New York Times article, “Cuomo’s Medicaid Changes Are at Washington’s Mercy.”

Professor Michael Hayesessay on workers’ rights appeared in the Sept. 3 (Labor Day) issue of the Sun.

Professor David Jaros forthcoming Columbia Law Review article, “Perfecting Criminal Markets,” was described as “very interesting” and “recommended” in Georgetown Law Professor Larry Solum’s Legal Theory Blog.

Professor Robert Lande addressed the American Antitrust Institute on Dec. 3. His talk, “Cartels as Rational Business Strategy: Crime Pays,” was based on an article that is scheduled for publication in the Cardozo Law Review.

Professor Michael Meyerson discussed his new book, Endowed by Our Creator: The Birth of Religious Freedom in America (Yale University Press, 2012), on Nov. 7 at the Enoch Pratt Library Central Branch. In the book, Meyerson demonstrates that the framers of the Constitution understood that the government should not acknowledge religion in a way that favors a particular creed or denomination. Nevertheless, the framers believed religion could instill virtue and help to unify a diverse nation. Through their writings and decisions, the framers affirmed that respect for religious differences is a fundamental American value. Now, Meyerson concludes, it is for us to determine whether religion is used to inspire and unify our religiously diverse nation—or to alienate and divide.

Clinical Fellow Lydia Nussbaum’s article “ADR’s Place in Foreclosure: Remedying the Flaws of a Securitized Housing Market” was accepted for publication in the Cardozo Law Review and will be published in 2013.

On Nov. 26, the School of Law hosted a lecture, book signing and celebration in honor of Professor Mortimer Sellers’ newest book, Parochialism, Cosmopolitanism, and the Foundations of International Law (Cambridge University Press). Sellers is the University System of Maryland Regents Professor of Law and director of the University of Baltimore School of Law’s Center for International and Comparative Law. Sellers also delivered the opening address of the Society of the Cincinnati American Revolution Institute’s Symposium, “The European Enlightenment, France and the Formation of the United States Constitution,” on Oct. 19. He was recently elected a member of the Association Internationale de Droit Constitutionnel (International Association of Constitutional Law).

STAFF

Vicki Schultz joined the law school in November as the associate dean for administration after serving as deputy assistant attorney general in the Civil Rights Division at the Department of Justice.  A UB Law alumna, Schultz previously served
as senior advisor at the Maryland Department of Labor, Licensing and Regulation and has worked in Maryland in the community development and legal services field during her legal career.

Hope Keller joined the law school in November as the director of communications after leaving The Baltimore Sun, where as industry editor she oversaw the business news staff and daily report. She has worked as a reporter and editor at several other newspapers, including The Daily Record, the Philadelphia Inquirer and the International Herald Tribune.

In December, Heather Cobbett joined the law school as the assistant director of external relations and communications. Cobbett has a master’s degree in public relations from the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications at Syracuse University and a bachelor’s in communication studies from Canisius College. Most recently, she served as the community services assistant for Finger Lakes Health in Geneva, N.Y.

Emily Rogers has joined the law school as the assistant director of the Law Career Development Center, where she helps manage the externship programs and coordinates public-interest programming and events. Rogers, who received her J.D. from the University of Baltimore School of Law in 2012, is experienced in immigration law and public policy.

Katie Rolfes, administrative assistant in the Office of Academic Affairs in the School of Law, received a 2012 UB Staff Recognition Award. UB President Robert L. Bogomolny recognized Rolfes and other award winners at the university’s Sept. 13 convocation.

STUDENTS

Caroline Mapp, 2L, earned the position of senior editor on the Southern Region Black Law Students Association Law Journal, based on her participation in the publication’s summer “write on” competition. UB joins more than 45 law schools represented on the journal’s staff.

Amanda Webster, 3L, took third place in the College of Labor and Employment Lawyers and American Bar Association Section of Labor and Employment Law Annual Law Student Writing Competition for 2011-12. A panel of labor and employment law attorneys in the United States and Canada judged the submissions. Webster was honored for her scholarly paper “The Collective Bargaining Chips Are Down: How Wisconsin’s Collective Bargaining Restrictions Place the U.S. in Violation of International Labor Laws,” which also will be recognized in a future issue of the ABA Journal of Labor & Employment Law.

Tawny Holmes, 3L, has been named to the board of directors of the National Association of the Deaf for the 2012-14 term. Holmes has been appointed to serve as an advisor on education and early-intervention issues. She is focusing on education law at UB.

Jessica Emerson, 3L, was awarded the U.S. Court of Federal Claims Bar Association’s Carole Bailey Scholarship. The $5,000 award is given to law students with a demonstrated commitment to public service. Emerson is co-president of UB Students for Public Interest.

ALUMNI: STAY IN TOUCH!

Are you a UB graduate with a new job? A promotion? Keep us posted about your professional news by completing the form found here. All submissions will be verified by School of Law staff and may be edited for length and style. Please provide your graduation year and the type of degree you earned. For questions, please contact us at lawaccolades@ubalt.edu.

PLEASE DONATE TO UB

The support of our dedicated alumni and friends is crucial to the School of Law’s success. Please consider giving to the School of Law Annual Fund and thank you for your commitment to the University of Baltimore School of Law.

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