Prof. Murphy: ‘Breakdowns’ in Juvenile Justice System Contributed to Baltimore County Officer’s Murder – But There’s More to Case Than That

Laurence M. Katz Professor of Law Jane Murphy, director of the Juvenile Justice Project

Interviewed on WBAL radio about the recent murder of a Baltimore County police officer during a traffic stop involving four juveniles, Jane C. Murphy, the Laurence M. Katz Professor of Law in the University of Baltimore School of Law and director of its Juvenile Justice Project, says that failures in the state’s juvenile justice system may have played a role in the incident. Still, she adds, the deeper cause is rooted in what the accused perpetrators believed about themselves—and, she believes, this is where the system must produce results.

“There were some breakdowns in the system here,” Murphy said, citing the need for GPS tracking of juveniles who are in trouble with the law.

Dawnta Harris, the 16-year-old charged with the murder of Officer Amy Caprio, has admitted to the court that he drove his vehicle at her during the stop. He had been placed on home detention following a string of car thefts and an escape from juvenile detention, but was missing before the incident. Three other youths in the car with him have been charged as adults with murder and burglary, according to media reports.

Prof. Murphy told WBAL that not only should flaws in the system be worked out, but larger conversations about how to prevent young people from becoming offenders need to take place.

“We need to begin to look at investment in kids as important to our public safety and national security as investments in the police and the military,” she said. “We need to value every child’s life in ways that make them feel they value their own life and the lives of others like officer Caprio.”

Read the WBAL article.

Learn more about Prof. Murphy.

 

Advertisements
Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Prof. Bessler’s Book a Finalist for National Indie Excellence Award

Professor John Bessler

The National Indie Excellence Awards nominated The Celebrated Marquis: An Italian Noble and the Making of the Modern World, a recent book by University of Baltimore School of Law Professor John Bessler, as a finalist in its 12th annual overview of independently published works. Although Prof. Bessler’s book did not win the award, it was one of only three titles to receive finalist status.

The Celebrated Marquis also was named the winner in the Autobiography/Biography category of the 2018 Next Generation Indie Book Awards. The book, published in February, examines the influence of the 18th-century economist and writer Cesare Beccaria, whose ideas helped shape the American and French revolutions as well as constitutions and laws around the globe.

Learn more about The Celebrated Marquis: An Italian Noble and the Making of the Modern World.

Learn about Prof. Bessler.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Prof. Gilman: Supreme Court’s New Labor Ruling Doesn’t Reflect Realistic View of Workplace

Venable Professor of Law Michele Gilman

Michele Gilman, the Venable Professor of Law in the University of Baltimore School of Law and director of its Saul Ewing Civil Advocacy Clinic and co-director of the Center on Applied Feminism, writes in Salon that the Supreme Court’s decision in the Epic Systems Corp. v. Lewis case may exacerbate a number of hot-button topics in the American workplace, including the problem of unpaid hours and the misclassification of employees. The growing #MeToo movement also takes a hit from this decision, she says.

“As a law professor who directs a clinical legal program that regularly represents low-wage workers, I believe this ruling essentially allows employers to hide workplace injustices while also potentially making it harder for workers—including victims of sexual harassment—to find justice,” Prof. Gilman writes.

In her analysis of the decision’s ramifications, Gilman points to the influence of Associate Justice Neil Gorsuch, author of the majority opinion.

“In my view, his opinion rests on a view of the workplace that few workers would recognize,” Prof. Gilman writes. “In Gorsuch’s world, employers and employees have equal bargaining power and mutually agree to arbitrate disputes.”

She argues that worker arbitration is a difficult, expensive proposition, and Epic Systems will result in spotty enforcement of existing laws because of these obstacles.

“In other words, as employers gain impunity from liability, wage violations will increase,” Prof. Gilman writes. “Workers will suffer.”

Read the Salon piece.

Learn more about Prof. Gilman, the Saul Ewing Civil Advocacy Clinic, and the Center on Applied Feminism.

 

 

Posted in Uncategorized | 1 Comment

Prof. Wehle: From Emoluments to Criminal Prosecutions, Trump is Testing the Limits of the Constitution

Professor Kimberly Brown

Writing in The Hill, University of Baltimore School of Law Professor Kimberly Wehle says that President Trump is testing the limits on executive power built into the United States Constitution.

“The stakes are extremely high,” Wehle writes in her opinion piece. “The idea behind the Constitution’s structure is simple: If we constrain government power by design, then individual rights and freedoms will endure, regardless of which political party controls the White House and Congress.

“Trump’s constitutional maneuvering is forcing a re-thinking of this foundational tenet of the Constitution.”

Prof. Wehle introduces several ongoing matters, including a legal case objecting to Trump’s refusal to divest his financial holdings—a situation addressed in the document’s Emoluments Clause.

Later, she considers the continuing investigation of Russia’s meddling in the 2016 election, and the likelihood of the case reaching the president.

“At this point, there are no easy outs for President Trump when it comes to the Mueller investigation,” Wehle writes. “If he testifies under oath, he is at serious risk of perjuring himself. If he refuses, he could face a subpoena, which he could seek to quash on constitutional grounds….

“If Trump were to find himself similarly situated, he could refuse to testify, claiming his Fifth Amendment right against self-incrimination. But even more Trump-esque, he could ignore a court order directing that he testify and instruct the U.S. Marshal’s service not to enforce it (in the typical case, a party that refuses to comply with a court order faces arrest and jailtime for contempt). It is fair to stay that all measure of constitutional hell could break loose at that point.”

Read the op-ed.

Learn more about Prof. Wehle.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Prof. Bessler’s Book Earns Indie Biography Award

University of Baltimore School of Law Professor John Bessler‘s recent book, The Celebrated Marquis: An Italian Noble and the Making of the Modern World, has been named the winner in thIndieBookAwards196e Autobiography/Biography category of the 2018 Next Generation Indie Book Awards. The book, published in February, examines the influence of the 18th-century economist and writer Cesare Beccaria, whose ideas helped shape the American and French revolutions as well as constitutions and laws around the globe.

Learn more about The Celebrated Marquis: An Italian Noble and the Making of the Modern World.

Learn about Prof. Bessler.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

UB Law Alumni Post Up in High Numbers in Latest Edition of The Daily Record’s Leadership in Law Awards

Fourteen alumni from the University of Baltimore School of Law are profiled in the latest edition of The Daily Record’s Leadership in Law edition. Congratulations to all 14 for this impressive career achievement!

In alphabetical order, they are:

Three alumni are included in the newspaper’s 2018 Generation J.D. honorees:

Finally, Thomas Minkin, J.D. ’65, is one of four members of the Maryland legal community being recognized with a Lifetime Achievement Award.

According to The Daily Record, this is the 18th year the newspaper has recognized members of the statewide legal community for their exemplary work. Winners were selected by a panel of legal and business leaders.

“Our Leadership in Law honorees are committed to excellence. They work tirelessly to uphold high legal standards in Maryland and devote much time serving as mentors to the next generation of legal professionals,” said Suzanne Fischer-Huettner, publisher of The Daily Record. “The recipients of our Lifetime Achievement Award are well-respected members of Maryland’s legal community who stand out for their professionalism and dedication to mentoring. Our Generation J.D. honorees are making their marks in the courtroom and in the community. We at The Daily Record are pleased to recognize the achievements of all our honorees.”

Nominations for all the awards were received from The Daily Record‘s readers in addition to area law firms, bar associations, chambers of commerce and the business and legal communities at large. Nominees were asked to complete an application that outlined their career accomplishments, community involvement and mentoring activities that would distinguish them as outstanding leaders in the law.

One top honoree will be announced at the celebration event on May 17 at the BWI Hilton. That person will be determined by a vote of this year’s 26 Leadership in Law honorees.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Student Support Director Leslie Metzger to Retire

Metzger

After 31 years at the University of Baltimore School of Law, Director of Student Support Services Leslie Metzger will retire at the end of July.

Dionne L. Koller, associate dean for Academic Affairs and professor of law, is asking Metzger’s many colleagues and friends to help tell her story.

“We would love for our alums to hear about her retirement and encourage them to send us their photos or memories so that we can compile them,” Koller says.

Any (or all) of the following sorts of things will be included in a memory book:

  • a fun memory about working with Leslie
  • a note for Leslie
  • photos – the older the better!

Please send your items to Laurie Schnitzer by June 10. If you have things that are non-digital, e.g. copies of old UB catalogs with fun pictures, send word to Schnitzer and an attempt will be made to have the items scanned or photographed.

“Leslie has been an important part of UB Law’s history and a voice for students for over three decades,” Koller said. “She will always be part of the UB Law family.”

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment